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Bruno Mars Tickets


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Bruno Mars
Colonial Life Arena
Columbia, SC
Friday
6/13/2014
8:00 PM
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Don't want to miss The Bruno Mars in concert? See The Bruno Mars in concert by using the link below for an updated tour schedule. The Bruno Mars may add more dates to the tour in the future:

Bruno Mars 2014 Tour Dates & Tickets Info


Bruno Mars
The Chelsea - The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas
Las Vegas, NV
Saturday
2/15/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
The Chelsea - The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas
Las Vegas, NV
Sunday
2/16/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
Asiaworld-expo
Hong Kong
Saturday
3/29/2014
TBD
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Bruno Mars
Neal S. Blaisdell Center - Arena
Honolulu, HI
Friday
4/18/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
Neal S. Blaisdell Center - Arena
Honolulu, HI
Saturday
4/19/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
The Chelsea - The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas
Las Vegas, NV
Friday
5/23/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
The Chelsea - The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas
Las Vegas, NV
Saturday
5/24/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars & Aloe Blacc
Save Mart Center
Fresno, CA
Tuesday
5/27/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars & Aloe Blacc
Oracle Arena
Oakland, CA
Wednesday
5/28/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
Hollywood Bowl
Los Angeles, CA
Saturday
5/31/2014
7:30 PM
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Bruno Mars
Hollywood Bowl
Los Angeles, CA
Sunday
6/1/2014
7:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
Bank Of Oklahoma Center
Tulsa, OK
Wednesday
6/4/2014
7:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
New Orleans Arena
New Orleans, LA
Saturday
6/7/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
Verizon Arena
North Little Rock, AR
Tuesday
6/10/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
BJCC Arena
Birmingham, AL
Wednesday
6/11/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
Colonial Life Arena
Columbia, SC
Friday
6/13/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
PNC Arena
Raleigh, NC
Friday
6/13/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
Van Andel Arena
Grand Rapids, MI
Tuesday
6/17/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
Palace Of Auburn Hills
Auburn Hills, MI
Wednesday
6/18/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
First Midwest Bank Amphitheatre
Tinley Park, IL
Friday
6/20/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
Xcel Energy Center
Saint Paul, MN
Saturday
6/21/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
CenturyLink Center Omaha
Omaha, NE
Monday
6/23/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
Marcus Amphitheater
Milwaukee, WI
Wednesday
6/25/2014
7:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
US Bank Arena
Cincinnati, OH
Friday
6/27/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
Quicken Loans Arena
Cleveland, OH
Saturday
6/28/2014
7:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
First Niagara Center
Buffalo, NY
Monday
6/30/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
TD Garden
Boston, MA
Wednesday
7/2/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
Xfinity Theatre
Hartford, CT
Wednesday
7/9/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
Jiffy Lube Live
Bristow, VA
Friday
7/11/2014
7:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
Jiffy Lube Live
Hershey, PA
Friday
7/11/2014
7:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
Madison Square Garden
New York, NY
Monday
7/14/2014
7:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
Madison Square Garden
New York, NY
Monday
7/14/2014
7:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
Susquehanna Bank Center
CITYSTATE
Thursday
7/17/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
Verizon Wireless Arena - NH
Manchester, NH
Friday
7/18/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
Times Union Center
Albany, NY
Sunday
7/20/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
Centre Bell
Montreal, Canada
Wednesday
7/23/2014
7:30 PM
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Bruno Mars
Canadian Tire Centre
Ottawa, Canada
Thursday
7/24/2014
7:30 PM
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Bruno Mars
MTS Centre
Winnipeg, Canada
Saturday
8/2/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
Scotiabank Saddledome
Calgary, Canada
Tuesday
8/5/2014
8:00 PM
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Gorge Amphitheatre
Gorge Amphitheatre
Quincy, WA
Saturday
8/9/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
Matthew Knight Arena
Eugene, OR
Monday
8/11/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
Harveys Outdoor Arena - Lake Tahoe
Stateline, NV
Thursday
8/14/2014
7:30 PM
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Bruno Mars
SAP Center
San Jose, CA
Friday
8/15/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
Fiddlers Green Amphitheatre
Englewood, CO
Sunday
8/17/2014
7:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
The Chelsea - The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas
Las Vegas, NV
Friday
8/22/2014
8:00 PM
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Bruno Mars
The Chelsea - The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas
Las Vegas, NV
Saturday
8/23/2014
8:00 PM
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AltBaltimore currently has three major trail systems within the city. The Gwynns Falls Trail runs from the Inner Harbor to the I-70 Park and Ride, passing through Gwynns Falls Park and possessing numerous branches. There are also many pedestrian hiking trails traversing the park. The Jones Falls Trail currently runs from the Inner Harbor to the Cylburn Arboretum; however, it is currently undergoing expansion. Long term plans call for it to extend to the Mount Washington Light Rail Stop, and to also incorporate a spur alongside Western Run. The two aforementioned trails carry sections of the East Coast Greenway through the city. There is also the Herring Run Trail, which runs from Harford Road east to its end beyond Sinclair Lane, utilizing Herring Run Park; long term plans also call for its extension to Morgan State University. There are long-term plans for more trails to be built or expanded, including the Stony Run Trail.hough she did not complete the invitational, Haley continues to train and, with three of her teammates Mina (Maddy Curley), Wei Wei (Nikki SooHoo) and Joanne (Vanessa Lengies), qualifies for the National Championships. The biased judging leaves her far back in the all-around standings, but this does not keep her out of the event finaThe Stick is available with passive or active pickup modules. Customized Roland GK-3 pickups are available for the treble or bass side of the instrument, allowing the instrument to drive one or two guitar synthesizers such as the Roland GR-20 or Axon AX-100, and also to drive other MIDI instruments orBoth human and animal heads frequently occur as mobile charges in heraldry. The blazon, or heraldic description, usually states whether an animal's head is couped (as if cut off cleanly at the neck), erased (as if forcibly ripped from the body), or cabossed (turned affronté without any of the neck showing). Human heads are often described in much greater detail, though some of these are identified by name with little or no further description. sequencers chained to the guitar synthesizer. The hammer-on style of playing produces a rising waveform transient that is easily tracSB7 Stick Bass - Original "Stick Bass" model with string-spacing close to the current 10-string Chapman Stick, which is narrower than the SB8 8-string Stick Bass. 2 Bartolini Bass Pickups (1 "Soapbar" & 1 "Single Coil"-sized: only 1 selectable at a time) with Mono-only output as opposed to virtually all the previously built and current to the original & upgraded over time passive "Stickup", newer active EMG "ACTV-2" Block, passive Villex "PASV-4" and "R-Block" Railboard Pickup Modules, all of which have Stereo-or-Mono output. Only 1 Production Run completed in 1996-97 until replaced by the more Stick-like SB8 in March 1998.[5][6] Only 1 Production Run of this particular Stick model was built before beingA glow stick is a self-contained, short-term light-source. It consists of a translucent plastic tube containing isolated substances that, wThe most prominent and best recorded use of the split tally stick (or "nick-stick"[5][6]) being used as a form of currency was when King Henry I initiated the tally stick system in or around 1100 in medieval England. He would only accept the tally stick for taxes, and it was a tool of the Exchequer for the collection of taxes by local sheriffs (tax farmers "farming the shire") for seven centuries. The split tally of the Exchequer was in continuous use until 1826. In 1834, the tallies themselves were ordered to be burned in a stove in the Houses of Parliament, but the fire went out of control setting the buiThe manner of cutting is as follows. At the top of the tally a cut is made, the thickness of the palm of the hand, to represent a thousand pounds; then a hundred pounds by a cut the breadth of a thumb; twenty pounds, the breadth of the little finger; a single pound, the width of a swollen barleycorn; a shilling rather narrower; then a penny is marked by a single cut without rem"Carrot and Stick Approach" (also "carrot or stick apHEAD NV is a sports equipment and clothing company, known mainly for their alpine skis and tennis racquets. It is also affiliated with an Indonesian maker of kretek clove cigarettes, Gudang Garam. The current company includes parts of several previously independent companies, including Head Ski Company, founded in Delaware in 1950, Tyrolia, an Austria ski-equipment manufacturer, and Mares, an Italian manufacturer of diving equipment.[2] Head Ski Company produced one of the first successful metal-wood composite downhill ski, the Head Standard, and one of the first ovHead's tennis racquets are used by many current top tennis stars such as Novak Djokovic, Andy Murray, Tommy Haas, Richard Gasquet, Gilles Simon, Maria Sharapova, Svetlana Kuznetsova, Tomáš Berdych, Ivan Ljubicic, Mikhail Youzhny, as well as still active legends like Andre Agassi, Steffi Graf, Goran Ivaniševic and many more. Roughly 30% of the Top 100 tennis players on the ATP Tour currently use Head teThe company was founded in Baltimore, Maryland in 1950 by aeronautical engineer Howard Head, after he took a ski trip and was astonished to see his skis were made of wood in an era when metals and plastics was replacing wood in many product designs. Head worked at the Glenn L. Martin Company where they used a form of aluminum and plastic laminate to build the fuselages of aircraft, and he felt the same material would make an ideal ski. After two years of constantly breaking skis, by the winter of 1950 they had a design that not only stayed together, but made turning dramaticaThe Head Standard would rapidly grow in sales through the 1950s, until it and other Head designs were capturing over 50% of the US market during the 1960s, making them the leading ski manufacturer in the U.S. and U.K.. Head resisted the change to fibreglass construction and was known for interfering in day-to-day operations. In 1967, Howard Head hired Harold Seigle as company president, and became the Chairman of the Board and CEO. Bored of the results, in 1969 Head sold the company to AMF in 1969, and took up tennis. He later bought a controlling interest in Prince Sports.lly easier.nnis racqueer-sized metal tennis proach") is an idiom that refers to a policy of offering a combination of rewards and punishment to induce behavior. It is named in reference to a cart driver dangling a carrot in front of a mule and holding a stick behind it. The mule would move towards the carrot because it wants the reward of food, while also moving away from the stick behind it, since it does not want the punishment of pain, thus drawinPunji sticks would be placed in areas likely to be passed through by enemy troops. The presence of punji sticks may be camouflaged by natural undergrowth, crops, grass, brush or similar materials. They were often incorporated into various types of traps; for example, a camouflaged pit into which a man might fall (it would thenSometimes a pit would be dug with punji sticks in the sides pointing downward at an angle. A soldier stepping into the pit would find it impossible to remove his leg without doing severe damage, and injuries might be incurred by the simple act of falling forward while one's leg is in a narrow, vertical, stake-lined pit. Such pits would require time and care to dig the soldier's leg out, immobilizing the unit longer than if the foot were simply pierced, in which case the victim could be evacuated by stretcher or fireman's carry if Punji sticks were sometimes deployed in the preparation of an ambush. In the preparation of these stakes, the stake itself would be sharpened and, in some cases, rubbed with toxic plants, frogs or even feces, to cause infections in the wounded enemy. Soldiers lying in wait for the enemy to pass would deploy punji sticks in the areas where the surprised enemy might be expected to take cover, thus, soldiers diving for cover would impale themselves.[1]necessary.[1] be a trou de loup).g the cart.oving any wood.lding afire.hen combined, make light through chemiluminescence, so it does not require an external energy source. The light cannot be turned off, and can be used only once. Glow sticks are often used for recreation, but may also be relied upon for light during military, poSeveral US patents for "glow stick" type devices were received by various inventors. Most of these are assigned to the US Navy. The earliest patent lists Bernard Dubrow and Eugene Daniel Guth as having invented a Packaged Chemiluminescent Material in June 1965 (Patent 3,774,022). In October 1973, Clarence W. Gilliam, David Iba Sr., and Thomas N. Hall were registered as inventors of the Chemical Lighting Device (Patent 3,764,796). In June, 1974 a patent for a Chemiluminescent Device was issued with Herbert P. Richter and Ruth E. Tedrick listed as the inventIn January 1976, a patent was issued for the Chemiluminescent Signal Device, with Vincent J. Esposito, Steven M. Little, and John H. Lyons listed as the inventors (Patent 3,933,118). This patent recommended a single glass ampoule that is suspended in a second substance, that when broken and mixed together, provide the chemiluminescent light. The design also included a stand for the signal device so it could be thrown from a moving vehicle and remain standing in an upright position on the road. The idea was this would replace traditional emergency roadside flares and would be superior, since itIn December 1977 a patent was issued for a Chemical Light Device with Richard Taylor Van Zandt as the inventor (Patent 4,064,428). This design alteration features a steel ball that shatters the glass ampoule when the glow stick is exposed to a predetermined level of shock; an example of its use being that an arrow can be flown dark but illuminate its landing location upon sGlow sticks are used for many purposes. They are waterproof, do not use batteries, generate negligible heat, are inexpensive, and are reasonably disposable. They can tolerate high pressures, such as those found underwater. They are used as light sources and light markers by In the late 1960s, a tennis division was created when Howard Head figured out a way of strengthening the tennis racquet by introducing the aluminium frame. The idea became a success and was first introduced in the 1969 US Open. After Howard Head's departure, one of the tennis players that Head sponsored, Arthur Ashe, won Wimbledon, defeating favored Jimmy Connors in 1975. Also during the 1970s, Head acquired a diving manufacturer, Mares, and a ski binding company, Tyrolia. While under AMF ownership, Head manufactured tennis racquets in Boulder, Colorado, and Kennelbach, Austria. Also in 1969, Head signed Olympic champion ski racer Jean-Claude Killy to endorse a new metal and fiberglass ski, the Killy 800. Head subsequently developed an entire product line In 1985, Minneapolis-based Minstar Inc. acquired Head through hostile takeover of AMF.[4] Two years later, Head started making athletic footwear, and introduced the "Radial Tennis Shoes". The following year, Head opened a new plant in Austria in order to produce more tennis racquets. In 1989, management bought out Head, Tyrolia, and Mares, to form HTM. The takeover was backed by private equity firm Freeman Spogli & Co. In 1993, HTM was sold to tobacco conglomerate Austria Tabak. Johan Eliasch, the current chairman, took over the company in 1995.of Killy skis.military forces, campers, and recreational divers.[6] Glow sticks are considered the only light source that is safe for use immediately following any catastrGlowsticking is the use of glow sticks in dancing.[7] This is one of their most widely known uses in popular culture, as they are frequently used for entertainment at parties (in particular raves), concerts, and dance clubs. They are used by marching band conductors for evening performances; glow sticks are also used in festivals and celebrations around the world. Glow sticks also serve multiple functions as toys, readily visible night-time warnings to motorists, and luminous markings that enable parents to keep track of their children. Yet another use is for balloon-carried light effects. Glow sticks are also used to create special effects in low light photographyGlow sticks give off light when two chemicals are mixed. The sticks consist of a tiny, brittle container within a flexible outside container. Each container holds a different solution. When the outer container is flexed, the inner container breaks, allowing the solutions to combine, causing the necessary chemical reaction. After breaking, the tube is shaken to thoroughly mix the twoIn glow sticks, phenol is produced as a byproduct. It is advisable to keep the mixture away from skin and to prevent accidental ingestion if the glow stick case splits or breaks. If spilled on skin, the chemicals could cause slight skin irritation, swelling, or, in extreme circumstances, vomiting and nausea. Some of the chemicals used in older glow sticks were thought to be potential carcinogens.[10] The sensitizers used are polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, a class of compounds known for theiThe glow stick contains two chemicals and a suitable dye (sensitizer, or fluorophor). TBy adjusting the concentrations of the two chemicals, manufacturers can produce glow sticks that either glow brightly for a short amount of time or more dimly for an extended length of time. This also allows design of glow sticks that perform satisfactorily in hot or cold climates, by compensating for the temperature dependence of reaction. At maximum concentration (typically only found in laboratory settings), mixing the chemicals results in a furious reaction, producing large amounts of light for only a few seconds. Heating a glow stick also causes the reaction to proceed faster and the glow stick to glow more brightly for a brief period. Cooling a glow stick slows the reaction a small amount and causes it to last longer, but the light is dimmer. This can be demonstrated by refrigerating or freezing an active glow stick; when it warms up again, it will resume glowing. The dyes used in glow sticks usually exhibit fluorescence when exposed to ultraviolet radiation—even a spent glow stick may therefore shine unA combination of two fluorophores can be used, with one in the solution and another incorporated to the walls of the container. This is advantageous when the second fluorophore would degrade in solution or be attacked by the chemicals. The emission spectrum of the first fluorophore and the absorption spectrum of the second one have to largely overlap, and the first one has to emit at shorter wavelength than the second one. A downconversion from ultraviolet to visible is possible, as is conversion between visible wavelengths (e.g., green to orange) or visible to near-infrared. The shift can be as much as 200 nm, but usually the range is about 20-100 nm longer than the absorption spectrum.[12] Glow sticks using this approach tend to have colored containers, due to the dye embedded in the plastic. Infrared glow sticks may appear dark-red to black, as the dyes absorb the visible light produced inside the container The pointing stick operates by sensing applied force, by using a pair of resistive strain gauges. The velocity of the pointer depends on the applied force. On a QWERTY keyboard, the stick is typically embedded between the "G", "H" and "B" keys, and the mouse buttons are placed just below the space bar. The mouse buttons can be operated right-handed or left-handed due to their placement below the keyboard along the centerline. This pointing device has also appeared next to screens on compact-sized laptops such as Toshiba The IBM TrackPoint III and the TrackPoint IV have a feature called Negative Inertia that causes the pointer's velocity to "overreact" when it is accelerated or decelerated. Negative Inertia is intended to avoid feeling of inertia or sluggishness when starting or stopping movement.[2] Usability tests at IBM have shown that it is easier for users to position the pointer with Negative Inertia, and performanIn practice, if the re-calibration interval is set too short and if the user applies moderately consistent pressure to the stick for such an interval, this method results mistakenly re-zeroed the stick and the pointer stops. Additional pressure again moves the cursor, but the calibration may occur again, requiring even more force. If the user releases pressure at this point, the change will be interpreted as an instruction to move the opposite direction. In time,the software will re-cIn 1984, Ted Selker, a researcher at PARC, worked on a pointing stick based on a study[citation needed] that a typist needs a relatively long 0.75 sec to shift the hand from the keyboard to the mouse, and comparable time to shift back. Selker built a model of a device that would minimize this time. It was only three years later, working at IBM, that Selker refined his design, resulting in the TrackPoint product[4] for which IBM received Some users feel that pointing sticks cause less wrist strain, because user does not need to avoid resting wrists on a touchpad, usually located just below the keyboard. One criticism is that because the pointing stick depends on the user applying pressure, it can cause hand cramps (although this can be partly solved by setting the sensitivity to high, and lifting the finger when the pointer is not being moved). Another criticism is that it stresses the index finger and may lead to repetitivA number of ergonomic studies to compare trackpoint and touchpad performance have been performed.[9][10] Most studies find that touchpad is slightly faster; one study found that "the touchpad was operated 15% faster than the trackpoint".[11] Another study found that average object selection time was faster with a touchpad, 1.7 sec compared to 2.2 sec with a trackpoint, and object manipulation took 6.2 sec with a touchpad, on average, against 8A tally (or tally stick) was an ancient memory aid device used to record and document numbers, quantities, or even messages. Tally sticks first appear as animal bones carved with notches, in the Upper Paleolithic; a notable example is the Ishango Bone. Historical reference is made by Pliny the Elder (AD 23–79) about the best wood to use for tallies, and by Marco Polo (1254–1324) who mentions tIn fluid dynamics, head is a concept that relates the energy in an incompressible fluid to the height of an equivalent static column of that fluid. From Bernoulli's Principle, the total energy at a given point in a fluid is the energy associated with the movement of the fluid, plus energy from pressure in the fluid, plus energy from the height of the fluid relative to an arbitrary datum. Head is expressed in units of height such as meters or feet.he use of the tally in China. Tallies have been used for numerous purposes such as messaging and scheduling, and especially in financial and legal transactions, to the point of beThe single tally stick was an elongated piece of bone, ivory, wood, or stone which is marked with a system of notches (see: Tally marks). The single tally stick serves predominantly mnemonic purposes. Related to the single tally concept are messenger sticks (e.g., Inuit tribes), the knotted cords, khipus or quipus, as used by the Inca. Herodotus (c. 485–425 BC) reported the use of a knotted cord by Darius I The split tally was a technique which became common in medieval Europe, which was constantly short of money (coins) and predominantly illiterate, in order to record bilateral exchange and debts. A stick (squared hazelwood sticks were most common)In 1997, Head created the first titanium and graphite tennis racquet. Over the next two years, Head acquired three more companies, DACOR, BLAX, and Penn Racquet Sports, Inc. Penn tennis balls are used in many high profile tournaments worldwide, while Penn racquetballs are the official ball of the IRT and U.S. Racquetball Association. Penn once produced tennis balls and racquetballs in Phoenix, Arizona. In March 2009, Head shut down the Penn ball manufacturing factory. Now all tennis balls are produced in China. was marked with a system of notches and then split lengthwise. This way the two halves both record the same notches and each party to the transaction received one half of the marked stick as proof. Later this technique was refined in various ways and became virtually tamper proof. One of the refinements was to make the two halves of the stick of different lengths. The longer part was called stock and was given to the party which had advanced money (or other items) to the receiver. The shorter portion of the stick was called foil and was given to the party which had received the funds or goods. Using this technique each of the parties had an identifiable record of the transaction. The natural irregularities in the surfaces of the tallies where they were split would mean that only the original two halves would fit back together perfectly, and so would verify that they were matching halves of the same transaction. If one party tried to unilaterally change the value of his half of the tally stick by adding more notches, those notches would not be on the other tally stick and would be revealed as an attempted forgery. The split tally was accepted as legal proof in medieval courts and the Napoleonic Code (1804) still makes reference to the tally stick in Article 1333.[4] Along the Danube and in Switzerland the tally was still used in the 20th century in rural economies.of Persia (c. 521–486 BC).ing currency..1 sec with trackpoint.[12]e strain injury.US patents in 1996.[5][6]alibrate and stop the motion.ce is 7.8% better.A head is the cephalic part of an animal, which usually comprises the brain, eyes, ears, nose and mouth, each of which aid in various sensory functions, such as sight, hearing, smell, and taste. Some very simple animals may not have a head, but many bilaterally symmetric forms do. Heads develop in animals by an evolutionary trend known as cephalization. In bilaterally symmetrical animals, nerve tissues concentrate at the anterior region, forming structures responsible for information processing. Through biological evolution, sense organs and feeding structures also concentrate into the anterior region; these collectively form the head.[3]Libretto, Sony VAIO UX, etc.and reemit near-infrared.der a black light.he chemicals inside the plastic tube are a mixture of the dye and diphenyl oxalate. The chemical in the glass vial is hydrogen peroxide. By mixing the peroxide with the phenyl oxalate ester, a chemical reaction takes place, yielding two molecules of phenol and one molecule of peroxyacid ester (1,2-dioxetanedione). The peroxyacid decomposes spontaneously to carbon dioxide, releasing energy that excites the dye, which then relaxes by releasing a photon. The wavelength of the photon—the color of the emitted light—depends on the structure of the dye. The reason the reaction is so slow and releases only light, not heat, is that the reverse 2+2 photocycloaddition of 1,2-dioxetanedione is a forbidden transition (it violates Woodward–Hoffmann rules) and cannot proceed through a regular thermal mechanism.r carcinogenity. components. and film.[8]ophic emergency.udden deceleration. was not a fire hazard, would be easier and safer to deploy, and would not be made ineffective if struck by passing vehicles. This design, with its single glass ampoule inside a plastic tube filled with a second substance that when bent breaks the glass and then is shaken to mix the substances, most closely resembles the typical glow stick sold today.ors (Patent 3,819,925).lice, fire, or EMS operations. replaced by the SB8 Stick Bass.ked by this type of device.ls. In the first event final, vault, Mina executes an extremely difficult maneuver perfectly but receives a low score (9.500 out of 10). When Vickerman questionsA poor audience response at an August 1968 screening in Los Angeles eventually forced the producers to edit the picture down from its original 110-minute length. The 86-minute Head premiered in New York City on November 6, 1968; the film later debuted in Hollywood on November 20. It was not a commercial success.[5] This was in part because Head, being an antithesis of The Monkees sitcom, comprehensively demolished the group's carefully groomed public image, while the older, hipper counterculture audience they had been reaching for rejected the Monkees' efforts out of hand.[5] the judges, he learns that Mina was deducted on the technicality of showing a bra strap. Haley is next up, however, instead of vaulting, she shows her bra strap to the judges and forfeits her turn in disgust (otherwise known as a "scratch"). The other gymnasts follow suit, earning a string of zeroes and forcing the judges to award Mina the vault gold medal anyway.

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